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Deer Hunting Poems by May Tanner

Our Deer Hunt

We were out of our beds at the break of dawn
Put all of our flashy red clothes on.

Then climbed to the top of the highest hill
There we waited and sat very still.

Straining our eyes for the sight of a deer,
But he out-smarted us and didn’t come near.

All we saw was where he’d been
So now it’s our turn to out-smart him.

This we did and had more luck
So came home with a 4-point buck.
May Tanner, 1964


Forgive Me

Father, forgive me on this the Sabbath Day
That I am not in church to help the others pray.

But I couldn’t be closer to you no matter how I’d try
In these majestic mountains and under the bluest sky.

The pine trees and the bushes are covered up with snow
Now the beautiful sunshine gives everything a glow.

So, Father, forgive me if even now and then I stray
And spend some time with nature, on this the Sabbath Day.
May Tanner, November 17, 1968


It’s very disappointing when a-hunting you do go
And you’re hoping for a great big buck, but don’t even see a doe.

On every knoll and hillside a hunter came in sight
From early in the morning until very late at night.

We know there’s deer around us from the signs and lots of tracks,
But I guess they’ve out-smarted us, so we might as well relax.

So we took a ride into the hills and around us everywhere
The pine trees and the aspen were a beautiful affair.
As we came up over a rise
We couldn’t believe our eyes
There in the road in front of us, a beautiful pair.

But to the weary hunter who has a tag to fill

All he could think of was, to get them in his scope
“Please don’t let me miss them,” is his very hope.

With rifle in hand he leaps from the car and takes special aim

Soon it’s all over, the deer lay at his feet.
Just on shot was all it took to get his winter’s meat.

So now the hunt is over, the suspense is all gone.
It wasn’t a big buck as usual, just a pair of fawns.

Now we’re not complaining, we’re happy as can be,
Just feeling mighty lucky for there weren’t many to see.
May Tanner, October 1977